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IATA and ICAO Regulations FAQs


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  1. What's the relationship between the IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations and the ICAO Technical Instructions?
  2. How do I know if my Lithium batteries meet the requirements of the "UN Manual of Tests and Criteria, Part III, subsection 38.3"?
  3. How do I safely package lithium batteries for transport?
  4. Can I ship recalled, damaged or non-conforming cells or batteries?

1.  What's the relationship between the IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations and the ICAO Technical Instructions?

The IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations is a "field manual" version of the ICAO Technical Instructions. Written and edited by airline dangerous goods experts, the Dangerous Goods Regulations presents the requirements for shipping dangerous goods by air in a user friendly, easy to interpret format. It also includes additional information which can assist shippers in making sure their consignments are in compliance and will be accepted quickly and easily by the airlines. Finally, since IATA airlines are somewhat stricter in their requirements than the ICAO Technical Instructions, the DGR specifies more precisely how to prepare a shipment.

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2.  How do I know if my Lithium batteries meet the requirements of the "UN Manual of Tests and Criteria, Part III, subsection 38.3"?

Check with the manufacturer or distributor for a recent MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheet). Usually such MSDS are available on corporate manufacturers websites.

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3.  How do I safely package lithium batteries for transport?

One of the major risks associated with the transport of batteries and battery-powered equipment is short-circuit of the battery as a result of the battery terminals coming into contact with other batteries, metal objects, or conductive surfaces. Packaged batteries or cells must be separated in a way to prevent short circuits and damage to terminals. They must be packed in a strong outer packaging or be contained in equipment.

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4.  Can I ship recalled, damaged or non-conforming cells or batteries?

Lithium batteries, identified by the manufacturer as being defective for safety reasons, or that have been damaged, that have the potential of producing a dangerous evolution of heat, fire or short circuit are FORBIDDEN for transport.

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